Reducing Equipment Failure through Asset Monitoring

by | Oct 23, 2014 | Asset Management, Reliability

Jim Cahill

Chief Blogger, Editor

Equipment failure is the leading cause of unplanned loss of production for most process manufacturers and producers. Critical equipment is typically continuously monitored but often other equipment has been too difficult or cost prohibitive to monitor.

Here is short 1:42 video, Emerson Essential Asset Monitoring, Reliability Solutions, which highlights how this second-tier equipment, also known as essential assets, includes pumps, heat exchangers, blowers, non-critical compressors, pipes and vessels, cooling towers, and air cooled heat exchangers. While these assets may not have been originally classified as “critical”, an outage or failure can cause a serious process disturbance or shutdown, resulting in lost production, potential reportable safety or environmental incidents and fines.

The Essential Asset Monitoring page provides more on the components to help monitor this equipment and where to learn more. You can also connect and interact with other reliability and asset management professionals in the Reliability & Maintenance track of the Emerson Exchange 365 community.

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The opinions expressed here are the personal opinions of the authors. Content published here is not read or approved by Emerson before it is posted and does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of Emerson.