Unpredictable Mother Nature Drives New Sugar Production Process

by | Apr 7, 2015 | Flow, Measurement Instrumentation

Maggie Schmidt

Flow Marketing Communications Manager / Blogger

American Crystal Sugar produces a lot of sugar in its six factories. The first step in the process is to wash sugar beets, and this creates a great deal of waste mud that has to be properly disposed. Shifting weather conditions – rainier than average seasons – increased the amount of water in the process, which drove the company to increase use of aged polymer that aids in the flocculation process and helps prevent buildup in the screw conveyers.

Thanks to Mother Nature’s unpredictability, American Crystal Sugar was compelled to find a way to more effectively meet odor restriction requirements, reduce costs for polymer use and disposal and increase overall capacity. They decided it was time to automate, and chose Micro Motion® ELITE® meters and DeltaV to make that happen.

How much money did they save by modernizing their process? We’ll tell you in this new case study, Factory reduces polymer usage in waste mud stream with Micro Motion meters.

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