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Emerson Viscosity Solution for Coiled Tubing Cleanout Measurement

by | Aug 11, 2016 | Flow, Measurement Instrumentation

Jason Leapley

Jason Leapley

Flow Instrumentation Director of Innovation

Manufacturing PlantIn coiled tubing cleanout, flow and viscosity measurements are critical for well control and verifying sweep effectiveness and efficiency. By integrating a dP cell with a Coriolis meter, a user is able to monitor gel viscosity development as well as flow rate.

The challenge most users face with this application is the measurement of non-Newtonian fluids. Current used technology is unreliable. This technology includes manual Saybolt funnel measurement and cup and bob rheometers. Since they are low-fidelity and/or very maintenance intensive, some of these technologies could lead to inefficient cleanout and even catastrophic stuck tubing.

Sign up for this session and learn how you can now get a reliable, real-time, in-line viscosity measurement for gel viscosity development and effectiveness of sweeps. This new solution also provides a paper trail for a user to provide to their customer for quality control compliance.

Register by August 31 and save $400 off the regular conference registration price.

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The opinions expressed here are the personal opinions of the authors. Content published here is not read or approved by Emerson before it is posted and does not necessarily represent the views and opinions of Emerson.